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Tuesday, December 15, 2009

MoMA | Tim Burton






Today I learned about an exhibition at MoMA that I will just have to see.  The Tim Burton exhibition will be on display through April 26th showing his art, sketches, interactive videos and a special video he has made just for MoMA.

Now, I just have to make time out of my crazy schedule to go.  Luckily I think I will be able to make it.  Does anyone know if dogs can go to MoMA? I think Oliver might enjoy it as well.



Taking inspiration from popular culture, Tim Burton (American, b. 1958) has reinvented Hollywood genre filmmaking as an expression of personal vision, garnering for himself an international audience of fans and influencing a generation of young artists working in film, video, and graphics. This exhibition explores the full range of his creative work, tracing the current of his visual imagination from early childhood drawings through his mature work in film. It brings together over seven hundred examples of rarely or never-before-seen drawings, paintings, photographs, moving image works, concept art, storyboards, puppets, maquettes, costumes, and cinematic ephemera from such films as Edward Scissorhands, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Batman, Mars Attacks!, Ed Wood, and Beetlejuice, and from unrealized and little-known personal projects that reveal his talent as an artist, illustrator, photographer, and writer working in the spirit of Pop Surrealism. The gallery exhibition is accompanied by a complete retrospective of Burton’s theatrical features and shorts, as well as a lavishly illustrated publication.



Burton's films include Vincent (1982), Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985), Beetlejuice (1988), Batman (1989), Edward Scissorhands (1990), Batman Returns (1992), The Nightmare Before Christmas (as creator and producer) (1993), Ed Wood (1994), Mars Attacks! (1996), Sleepy Hollow (1999), Big Fish (2003), Corpse Bride (2005), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), and Sweeney Todd (2007); writing and Web projects include The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy & Other Stories (1997) and Stainboy (2000).



 If you plan to see the exhibition Tim Burton (November 22, 2009–April 26, 2010), please be aware that gallery occupancy is limited. Timed tickets to enter Tim Burton are suggested on weekdays and required on all weekends and holidays (as well as Monday, December 28–Thursday, December 31, 2009, and Monday, January 4, 2010). Timed tickets guarantee entrance to the exhibition at the time designated on the ticket, and carry no extra charge. To purchase timed tickets for Tim Burton, simply select a specific date and time when you purchase your admission ticket online. On days when timed-tickets are required, a limited number of tickets are also available at the Museum on a first-come, first-served basis. This ticket also permits you to all other Museum galleries, exhibitions, and films.

Please note: Members and accompanying guests and Executive Courtesy Card holders need not wait to enter Tim Burton. Simply present your membership card, Executive Courtesy Card, and/or member guest admission ticket at the exhibition entrance.

Corporate Members do not receive priority admission, but we are pleased to extend special lunch-hour access to Corporate Members in January.
 








Interactive

Tim Burton

Explore the work of Tim Burton. Watch the video of the artist and behind the scenes footage of the installation.




Video

Tim Burton MoMA Spot

On view at MoMA
November 22, 2009–April 26, 2010

For more information please visit www.moma.org/timburton.

Directed by Tim Burton
Produced by Mackinnon and Saunders
CGI Animation: Flix Facilities
Animation: Chris Tichborne
Lighting Camera: Martin Kelly
Music by Danny Elfman

The Tim Burton exhibition is sponsored by Syfy.
 


Here is a sneak peak of some of Tim Burton's work on display at MoMA.  The exhibition checklist is 101 pages long showing each piece with the detailed information. To view and print the check list you can click here and click on exhibition checklist. It will open as a PDF for you to print.






 

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